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ELIGIBILITY INFO

Are You Eligible for Early Intervention Services?

Following a comprehensive developmental evaluation, the Early Intervention (EI) team (this includes the family as well as the other team members) will review the evaluation results. The team members will determine whether the child is eligible for the Birth to 3 Program.

A child is eligible if he or she meets one or more of the following criteria:

  • Diagnosed Condition
    A child is eligible for early intervention programs/services under the Birth to 3 Program if the EI team determines he or she has a diagnosed condition which will likely result in developmental delays. Examples include: Down Syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, Spina bifida, vision visual or hearing impairments, cerebral palsy, severe emotional disturbance, severe head injury, fetal alcohol syndrome, addiction at birth, maternal infection transmitted to the fetus such as AIDS or chronic or progressive conditions. See a list of all diagnosed conditions.
  • Developmental Delay
    A child could also be eligible for early intervention programs/services if the Early Intervention team determines that he or she has a developmental delay of 25% in one or more of the following areas: cognitive, gross motor skills, fine motor skills, communication, social/emotional development, cognition or self-help. See developmental expectations.
  • Atypical Development
    Even when a 25% developmental delay cannot be found in one or more developmental areas, your child may still be eligible for services if the early intervention team determines that he or she shows development that is atypical (unusual) and adversely affects his or her overall development.

Next Steps for the Birth to 3 Program

If the EI Team finds that a child is not eligible for the Birth to 3 Program's early intervention services, the team will offer to re-screen the child in six months. The service coordinator may also have suggestions or information about other resources to share with the family. With parental request and permission, the service coordinator will assist the family in locating and gaining access to other community services that may be helpful to them.

If the evaluation shows that the child is eligible for services, the next step is to identify exactly what his or her needs are and how to best meet those needs. This step is called assessment.